Palm Springs Modernism Week

Palm Springs Modernism Week
Tramway Gas Station (1965) by Albert Frey and Robson C. Chambers
Modernism Week is an exciting 11-day celebration of mid-century modern design, architecture, and culture in Palm Springs, California. This design aesthetic originated in the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, and was typified by clean, simple lines which came to define desert modernism. Modernism Week is filled with a variety of events including architectural tours, films, lectures, an architectural symposium, educational events, and chic, fun parties in cool mid-century modern homes.
Date information
Thursday, February 16, 2012 5:00AM

Welcome

January 15, 2015
By Jane King Hession
All images are courtesy of the Ralph Rapson Papers (N187), Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries, Minneapolis.
 
When it debuted in 1963, the Tyrone Guthrie Theatre put Minneapolis on the national cultural map and ushered in a new era in American regional theater. The opening night performance of Hamlet by the talented repertory company riveted the audience, but the Guthrie’s new modern building dazzled as well. Designed by architect Ralph Rapson, it was like nothing anyone had seen before. 
 
Photo (left): The Tyrone Guthrie Theatre with original screen. Photograph by Warren Reynolds.
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Modernism for the Masses: Richard Neutra's Drive-In Church image

Join Docomomo US and Docomomo US/SoCal on Saturday, January 31st from 1:00 – 4:00 PM for a special afternoon tour, lecture, and reception at Christ Cathedral in Garden Grove, California. The focus of the event will be Richard Neutra's 1961 Arboretum and 1968 Tower of Hope. Restoration of the Arboretum won a Docomomo US Modernism in America Award Citation of Merit in 2014. Tickets for the lecture, tour, and reception are $25 for Docomomo US members and $30 for non-members. Limited quantities of the Michael Murphy designed poster and postcards will be available exclusively the day of the event. 


Saturday, January 31, 2015 5:00PM
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January 15, 2015
By Meredith Arms Bzdak
 
The twentieth century brought new forms of drama and successive waves of technological advancement to the world of theatre. Architecturally, by mid-century, it also brought experimentation. The theatres and performing arts spaces designed and built in the 1950s, 60s, and 70s represent a range of Modern styles, from Neo-Expressionism to Brutalism. By definition, many of these theatres are now historic, having reached fifty years of age. Some have been recognized for their outstanding historical or architectural significance (Jorn Utzon’s Sydney Opera House, completed in 1973, was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2007) and a handful are world renowned as important cultural landscapes (New York City’s own Lincoln Center), but many more are misunderstood or underappreciated. In fact, pieces of this heritage are increasingly threatened. 
 
Photo (left): The Morris Mechanic Theater in Baltimore, Maryland
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SELECTIONS FROM THE REGISTER
Transamerica Pyramid
August 17, 2012
Transamerica Pyramid image
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Eames House
August 17, 2012
Eames House image
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Docomomo Ireland Hosts Conference

Docomomo Ireland will host a one-day conference on Wednesday, November 10th entitled:

What shall we do with the Modern Movement?

The conference will feature some of Ireland's and Europe's leading experts about contemporary best practice in relation to the inventorying, protection, management, reinterpretation, repair and conservation of modern 20th century architecture. The event will explore the significance of Ireland's Modern Movement heritage in a unique event intended to feed into the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage survey of Dublin, beginning in 2011.

Pre-registration is required.

The Architecture of Harry Weese

On Tuesday, October 26, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts will host a free lecture celebrating the release of The Architecture of Harry Weese, a new book by Robert Bruegmann and Kathleen Murphy Skolnik. The public is invited to experience the architecture of Harry Weese firsthand by joining Bruegmann for a lecture on the architect’s legacy in one of his most important buildings, the Church of Christ, Scientist, Chicago. Built in 1968, the church is a consummate example of the architect’s pioneering style and his significant contributions to Chicago’s architectural history. The lecture will be followed by a book signing.

 

SAVE THE DATE: TOUR DAY 2010!

The fourth Annual DOCOMOMO US Tour Day is upon us! Join DOCOMOMO US, our regional chapters and local
preservation organizations for  more than twenty modern
architecture tours throughout the United States.

Saturday, October 9, 2010

Click here for the schedule and additional information.

Call for Papers: 1960 Rome Olympics

A multi-disciplinary conference hosted by the American Academy in Rome from 30 September-2 October 2010 will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1960 Rome Summer Olympics. The conference focuses on these Games as a cultural turning point, with a significance—for Italy, the United States, the Soviet Union, and many other countries—that far transcends the actual sporting events, where the level of competition was unusually high.

Docomomo U.S. Board meets in Boston

On the weekend of April 16th, the Docomomo U.S. Board convened for its annual “face-to-face” meeting in Boston, Massachusetts. The gathering was organized by members of the New England Chapter and meetings were hosted in the Cambridge office of Bruner-Cott & Associates. The 2-day session focused on a review of the U.S. organization’s operational mission and strategies.

Architect John 'Jack' Warnecke, 1919-2010

Renowned architect John Carl “Jack” Warnecke died on April 17 at his home in Sonoma County, California at age 91.

Warnecke led one of the largest architectural firms in the nation — John Carl Warnecke and Associates - and produced designs for the Hawaii statehouse, embassies in Washington and abroad, structures at the U.S. Naval Academy, international airports and major universities. Warnecke was also responsible for designing the John F. Kennedy gravesite memorial at Arlington Cemetery.

Read his obituary here in the Press Democrat.

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