• t shirt burberry
  • wholesale nfl jerseys china
  • Wurster, William

    Greenwood Common

    Added by admin, last update: August 17, 2012, 12:40 pm

    Greenwood Common
    Location
    1-10 Greenwood Common
    Berkeley, CA 94708
    United States
    37° 52' 59.484" N, 122° 15' 33.6132" W
    Identity of Building / Site
    Primary classification: Residential (RES)
    Secondary classification:
    Federal, State, or Local Designation(s) and Date(s):
    History of Building/Site
    Original Brief:
    Dates: Commission / Completion:Commission 1952(c), completion 1952(c)-1955(e)
    Architectural and other Designer(s): Rudolph Schindler, Don Olson, Robert Klemmedson, Joseph Esherick, Harwell Hamilton Harris, Howard Moise, John Funk, and Henry Hill, architects Lawrence Halprin, landscape architect William Wurster, planner
    Others associated with Building/Site:
    Significant Alteration(s) with Date(s):
    Current Use: Private residences
    Current Condition: Good
    General Description:
    Construction Period:
    Original Physical Context:
    Evaluation
    Technical Evaluation:
    Social:
    Cultural & Aesthetic:
    Historical:
    General Assessment:
    Greenwood Common is a model residential grouping set on a spectacular site in the Berkeley Hills. It is an innovative plan for a suburban housing development, deviating from the typical American pattern of single houses on lots facing a street. Here each house sits on a small lot and automobile and pedestrian traffic are separated. A shared open space compensates for the small individual properties and creates a central lawn. Along with creative planning, the development incorporates a distinctive Modern landscape design characteristic of the San Francisco Bay Area by nationally-known landscape architect Lawrence Halprin. The site also contains eight Modern houses designed by some of the most influential architects of the Bay Area, who were significant practitioners by the Bay Area's distinctive regional adaptation of Modernism. Characteristic elements include economical materials and plans, flat or low-pitched roofs, simple volumes, wide overhanging eaves, wood siding, and a strong indoor/outdoor connection created with expanses of glass, patios, terraces and decks.
    Documentation
    Text references:
    Authoring
    Recorder/Date: DOCOMOMO US Northrn California Chapter, February 1997 & June 1998
    DOCOMOMO US
    P.O. Box 230977
    New York, NY 10023
    Terms of use | Contact | Privacy Policy | Credits
    © 2016 DOCOMOMO US Syndicate content Google+