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Preserving America's Pastime
posted on Friday, January 3, 2014

By Edith Bellinghausen
Last week’s Major League Baseball All-Star Game was played at Kauffman Stadium, home to the Kansas City Royals. The stadium was designed by Charles Deaton with Kivett & Meyers, and opened in 1973 alongside Arrowhead Stadium (home of the Kansas City Chiefs football team) as the Harry S. Truman Sports Complex. The construction of Kauffman and Arrowhead marked a move away from the multi-use stadium typology popular at the time and allowed each team to maximize stadium-based revenue streams. Other single-use stadiums built during the 1960s and 1970s still in use include Dodger Stadium (1962; Los Angeles) and Angel Stadium (1966; Anaheim). But almost all of the multi-use (so-called “cookie cutter”) stadiums have been demolished, including Shea Stadium (1964; New York), Veterans Stadium (1971; Philadelphia), Three Rivers Stadium (1970; Pittsburgh), and Busch Memorial Stadium (1966; St. Louis). The iconic Houston Astrodome, featured on the cover of Ana Mod’s Building Houston Modern and once called “the eighth wonder of the world”, sits in limbo as owners and city officials decide its fate. The stadium was designed by Hermon Lloyd & W.B. Morgan, with Wilson, Morris, Crain & Anderson and structural engineer Walter P. Moore, and opened in 1965 as the world’s first multi-use domed stadium. The last game was played there in 1999.

The Legacy of Wright
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 3, 2014

By Emily Rinaldi

In 1933, Frank Lloyd Wright made his first of what would become an annual trip to Phoenix, Arizona, to wait out the winter in the warm desert climate. In the years that follow, Wright would leave his mark on the Phoenix landscape, successfully constructing a number of his designs, the most famous being Taliesin West, Wright’s winter home and architectural school. After Wright’s passing, Phoenix continued to celebrate the architect’s legacy, posthumously constructing the Grady Gammage Memorial Auditorium in 1962, erecting the Scottsdale Spire in 2007, as well as renaming a portion of the city’s main east-west arterial road, “Frank Lloyd Wright Boulevard.”

 

Stone Cladding as Preservation Challenge
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 3, 2014

By Sarah Ripple

The architectural use of stone changed dramatically with the development of modern steel frame technology in the late nineteenth century, which resulted in the transition from stone as a load bearing material to a thin veneer. As with every many technology shifts in architecture, thin stone veneer experienced a period of trial and error from 1949-1980, and it was applied without real precedence or a comprehensive understanding of how it would perform (as per my own definition stone veneer is less than 3" in thickness). This reduction in stone thickness for cladding purposes required a rethinking of the systems for attachment to the structural framework, materials and detailing, and the stone selection process. Consequently, the modern architecture movement parallels the period of greatest technological change within stone veneer development.

Rediscovering Yamasaki: Appreciating 1960s Architecture
posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2012

By Theodore Prudon

YamasakiWhen Minoru Yamasaki was selected for the design of the twin towers of the World Trade Center, the New York Times noted: “Mr. Yamasaki is considered one of the country’s foremost architects”. As if to confirm that statement, four months later on January 18, 1963, he was on the front cover of Time Magazine surrounded by parts of his buildings following in the footsteps of Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen and Edward Durell Stone

Recent Architecture Blogs Discoveries
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 3, 2014

By Liz Waytkus

Advocacy efforts over Paul Rudolph’s endangered Orange County Government Center had the blogosphere in a tizzy last month in what some would describe as a modern architecture meme. While a number of larger newspaper and magazine blogs carried the story, many smaller personal blogs did too. As we bookmark and follow these blogs, we thought we would share our discoveries of those also working to document and discuss the finer (or more colorful) aspects our modern built heritage.

Efforts to Save John Johansen’s Stage Center
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 3, 2014

By: Emily Rinaldi

John Johansen’s Stage Center in Oklahoma City, OK stands in disuse and disrepair. Originally called the Mummer’s Theatre, the building was closed in 2010 after suffering considerable damage when the theater’s basement flooded. Built in 1970, the Stage Center is composed of three separate structures connected via ramps, tunnels, and tubes that frame an open, central space. The exterior is a series of raw concrete forms, punctuated by brightly colored corrugated steel in red, blue, yellow and orange.

Mid Tex Mod Hosts US/ICOMOS Pre-Conference Tour
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, June 15, 2012

By Kim McKnight

HemisfairOn a sunny afternoon May 30, Mid Tex Mod hosted a pre-conference tour of San Antonio’s modern heritage as part of the 15th Annual International Scientific Symposium of US/ICOMOS, a leading international heritage conservation organization. Tour participants were delighted to encounter modern resources seldom seen by the casual visitor to San Antonio.

Bertoia Screen Returns to 510 Fifth Avenue
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

In the last few months, the controversy regarding the landmarked Manufacturers Trust Company building at 510 Fifth Avenue designed by Gordon Bunshaft for SOM came to relative conclusion both with the settlement of lawsuit between Vornado Realty Trust and the local activist group Citizens Emergency Committee to Preserve Preservation, and the opening of the new Joe Fresh retail store.

 

 

 

 

"Et tu, Beton Brut?"
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

By Sarah Sher
In the past few months, there has been an extraordinary amount of press on Brutalist architecture, most of which has centered on the controversy of whether or not to demolish Paul Rudolph’s Orange County Government Center. The front-page article in the New York Times on April 7, “Architecture’s Ugly Ducklings May Not Get Time to Be Swans,” served as a catalyst for an explosion of newspaper, journal, magazine, and blog articles about the building and its Brutalist style, including pages and pages of reader comments.  

 

 

Advocacy and Endangered Lists
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

By Liz Waytkus and Francine Moralles

Endangered historic site lists, as a tool for advocacy, are being announced and promoted by many preservation organizations and architectural advocacy groups across the country. As these lists seem to proliferate, it’s interesting to step back and look at their genesis, the inclusion (or perhaps exclusion) of modern sites as a subset, the limits to modern site inclusion (mostly iconic by star architects), and endangered lists overall effectiveness.

 

Marcel Breuer Digital Archive
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, May 18, 2012

2012 Modernism Prize - Call for Nominations
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

World Monuments Fund (WMF) invites nominations for the 2012 World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize, which will be awarded this fall to a design professional or firm in recognition of innovative design solutions that preserved or saved a modern landmark at risk. The biennial prize was established to raise public awareness of the contribution modernism makes to contemporary life, the important place modernism holds in the architectural record, and the influential role that architects and designers play in preserving modern heritage. 

Fitch Colloquium 2012
by Liz Waytkus, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

Following World War II, the United States and Europe sought to address the dire need for public and affordable housing through new building. The decades after war saw the development of many innovative design, construction and social arrangements. This legacy represents an important part of our collective architectural and cultural heritage but its preservation is plagued by many practical and social issues. By bringing together American and International experts, the Fitch Colloquium seeks to create a dialogue about the preservation of these buildings, which are at the intersection of social, physical, cultural and architectural values.

Show Prentice Some Love
by admin, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

The Save Prentice Coalition wants you to Show Prentice Some Love this Valentine’s Day! Enter the on-line contest to let the world know how much you love Bertrand Goldberg’s 1975 Prentice Women’s Hospital. Your “valentine” to Prentice can take any form you like: photos, drawings, t-shirt graphics, songs, 60-second videos, haiku, tattoos, and construction paper hearts are all welcome. Entries are due by 5 pm on Monday, February 13th. The top 5 entries will be posted at www.saveprentice.org on Valentine’s Day for a public vote.

Modern Architecture & Design Scavenger Hunt
by admin, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

Join Docomomo US and openhousenewyork for a scavenger hunt across Manhattan and beyond. Spend a day exploring the city and taking photographs in front of examples of modern architecture and design for a chance to win great prizes! Hunt alone or as a team and learn about the historical buildings, spaces and the architects and designers that made major contributions to the cityscape. The hunt starting point and event opening will take place at Room & Board in SoHo at 11:00am. The hunt will conclude at the Spring Natural Kitchen, a new restaurant on the Upper West Side, where hunters can rest and enjoy a complimentary drink and munchies from 5:00-6:30pm.

Materials and Surfaces of the Tugendhat House
by admin, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

Docomomo US and World Monuments Fund invite you to a presentation entitled, Materials and Surfaces of the Tugendhat House: Investigation and Preservation of Authenticity.

By DR. IVO HAMMER, conservator, art historian, chairman of the Tugendhat House International Committee.

 

 

 

Hawaii Modernism Symposium
by admin, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

Registration is now open for the upcoming Hawaii Modernism Symposium. Join Historic Hawai‘i Foundation for presentations, discussion and celebration of Hawaii’s significant architecture, planning and engineering achievements from the middle of the 20th century.  The event entitled: “Hawai‘i Modernism: a Symposium on Identification, Evaluation and Preservation of Our Recent Past” will be held Saturday, January 21, 2012, 8 a.m. – 3 p.m. at the East West Center in Honolulu.

Arthur Q. Davis (1920-2011)
by admin, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

New Orleans architect Arthur Q. Davis passed away on Wednesday, 30 November 2011 at Ochsner Baptist Medical Center. A graduate of Tulane University's School of Architecture and a World War II veteran, Davis studied with Walter Gropius and apprenticed in Eero Saarinen's Michigan office.

Thank you for supporting Docomomo US
by admin, posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2012

As interest in architecture of the twentieth century grows, Docomomo US continues to be at the forefront of the modern architecture preservation movement. For almost two decades, Docomomo US has been the resource for the advancement of public understanding of modern architecture and landscape and the promotion of advocacy on its behalf.

Donnell Library Demolished
by admin, posted on Friday, January 24, 2014

On a busy stretch of midtown Manhattan, a somewhat unknown and unloved modern building has quietly been demolished. The Donnell Library (1955), a modest piece of design nestled among the likes of Philip Johnson, Edward Durell Stone and Yoshio Taniguchi, stood on the south side of West 53rd Street and was designed by Edgar I. Williams and Aymar Embury II.

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