NEWSLETTER

Metabolist Design: The Nakagin Capsule Tower, Japan

Text and Images by Jessica Baldwin

Today preservation efforts in the United States and all over the world are more and more focused on post-war architecture. In Japan, rapid development and the ever rising cost of real estate leaves much of post war architecture at risk. The Nakagin Capsule Tower, arguably one of the most iconic and acknowledged pieces of architecture in the World, stands as a statement to post-war architecture and urban development. 

Learning from Prentice

Prentice | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Interior | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Meeting | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Outreach Day | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Chicago Modern Lecture | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Panel Discussion | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Advertising on the L train | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Rally | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Bowling for Prentice | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Chicago Architecture Foundation Tour | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Demolition | Source: Chris Enck
Demolition | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Demolition | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice | Source: Hedrich Blessing


Welcome Docomomo US/Michigan!

Docomomo US has another chapter to add to its fold, this time it’s Michigan! The architectural historians, preservationists, and modern enthusiasts of Michigan have been talking about starting a chapter for years. However, it appears that moving slow and steady has been the best method in getting to the end of the race to a brand new beginning for advocacy, education, and outreach of modern design across the state’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. 

Gio Ponti: Fantasia Italiana in New York

Alitalia Offices, 5th Avenue, NY; Gio Ponti, 1958. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Alitalia Offices, 5th Avenue, NY; Gio Ponti, 1958. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Furniture Window and Organized Walls, Altamira, NY, Gio Ponti, 1953. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
“A Dining Room to Look At", mechanized dining-room displayed at the MUSA exhibition, the Brooklyn Museum, NY, Gio Ponti, 1950 | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives


Docomomo US Welcomes Three New Board Members in Houston

Docomomo US announced the election of three new members to its Board of Directors: Jennifer Magnolfi of New York, Robert Pullum of San Francisco and Robert Thomas of Boston. 

"Docomomo US is pleased to bring on Jennifer Magnolfi, Robert Pullum and Robert Thomas as new board members. Bob, Jen and Bob each bring a wealth of experience and dedication to modern architecture and design. Their knowledge continues to broaden the expertise and capabilities of the board, and strengthen the organization." 

 

That's a Wrap Houston!

By Jessica Smith

Preservation professionals and modernist enthusiasts from all over the country journeyed down to the Lone-Star State last month to celebrate Docomomo US’ second annual National Symposium where everything is big from the hats, hair, and modern architecture. Co-sponsored with Houston Mod, the Symposium took place at Houston’s University of St. Thomas, designed by Phillip Johnson in 1958, a location that facilitated the weekend’s discussions about modern architecture’s significance and role today. The jam-packed, three-day event offered guests a birds-eye view of modernism in Texas, the current state of preserving modernism, the ground-breaking work of architectural archivists and challenge to preserve the ephemeral. 

The Campaign to Save Shukhov Tower

By Natalia Melikova of the Constructivist Project

The Shukhov Tower on Shabolovka Street in Moscow made its first radio broadcast on March 19, 1922 and its first television broadcast on March 10, 1939. The first and largest of Vladimir Shukhov's hyperboloid towers, it is recognized as an engineering marvel and a masterpiece of constructivist architecture. In its 92 years of existence, it has come to be a symbol of progress, industrialization, and mass communication. With threats of dismantlement coming in just the last eight weeks, the Russian and international community have rallied behind its preservation.

Battelle/Talaris: Saving Seattle’s Newest Modern Landmark

By Eugenia Woo

Prompted by concerns for proposed future redevelopment plans for the former Battelle Memorial Institute Seattle Research Center (now Talaris Conference Center, 4000 NE 41st St) in Seattle’s Laurelhurst neighborhood, the Friends of Battelle/Talaris (FOBT), a grassroots community group, formed in early 2012 to advocate for the property's preservation and to produce a landmark nomination report. The 18-acre property has been owned by 4000 Property LLC (a holding company for Bruce McCaw, Telecom multimillionaire) since 2000. The group submitted a landmark nomination to the Seattle Historic Preservation Program in spring 2013. In Seattle, owner consent is not required before a nomination is submitted. The property was designated a landmark by the Seattle Landmarks Preservation Board in a unanimous vote on November 6, 2013.

Post World War II Collaboration: Robert Billsbrough Price, the American Plywood Association, and Prototype School Designs

By Caroline T. Swope

This article explores the collaboration between the Tacoma, Washington based Douglas Fir Plywood Association and Tacoma architect Robert Billsbrough Price that resulted in Henry F. Hunt Junior High School (1958) and Nell Hoyt Primary School (1959).[1] Both schools served as national prototypes for post-World War II plywood construction, and their designs were widely showcased in national and international publications with significant accolades for design, low cost, and short construction times.

The First Presbyterian Church of Stamford

"It’s like living inside a giant sapphire"

In the early 1950’s, the building committee of the First Presbyterian Church in Stamford, CT was evaluating where to put a typical white-steeple New England church on their vacant 11-acre campus. A member of the committee had just returned from a business trip in Michigan. There he saw a church in Midland designed by Alden Dow, a modernist architect. The committee’s dialogue changed in mid-stream. The result was a exemplary, modernist sacred space designed by Wallace K. Harrison.

 

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