NEWSLETTER

The Fabulous Forum: Successful Preservation of a Historic Sports Arena

By Christine Lazzaretto
 
Located in Inglewood, CA, the Forum opened with great fanfare in 1967 as the home to Los Angeles’ newest sports franchises: the Lakers (basketball) and Kings (hockey). When the Forum opened in the late 1960s, it had an immediate and significant impact on the cultural landscape of Southern California. To the City of Inglewood, the Forum was an important part of the local economy and inextricably linked with the City’s identity – Inglewood became known as the “City of Champions” due primarily to the success of the Lakers. In 1999, the Lakers and Kings relocated to the Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles – a move that was devastating to the City of Inglewood – and the Forum was sold to a local church. The Forum was underutilized, in disrepair, and faced possible demolition when it was purchased by the Madison Square Garden Company (MSG) in 2012. 

The University of Illinois’ State Farm Center: The Renovation of a Mid-Century “Flying Saucer”

By Lisa Napoles
 
One element of the dialogue that arose from the campaign to save the former Prentice Women’s Hospital designed by Bertrand Goldberg focused on the feasibility of repairing and preserving thin shell concrete structures. Thin shell concrete is costly and complicated to maintain, and, as in the case of Prentice, designs that are highly specific to the building’s original function can present challenges to adaptive re-use.
 
Photo (left): State Farm Center (formerly University of Illinois Assembly Hall), Harrison & Abramovitz, architects, 1957-1963. Photo credit: Creative Commons

SarasotaMOD

"The Sarasota Architectural Foundation is pleased to announce SarasotaMOD Week[end], from October 9-12. This four-day architectural festival takes place in Sarasota, a culturally sophisticated community located on the gleaming Gulf of Mexico. The event includes lectures and presentations by leading modernist architects, including Lawrence Scarpa, Tim Seibert, and Carl Abbott. Presenters also include architect John Howey, author of The Sarasota School of Architecture: 1941-1966; and architect Joe King, the co-author of Paul Rudolph: The Florida Houses. Author, critic and filmmaker Alastair Gordon, journalist Harold Bubil, and Ringling College of Art+Design professor Christopher Wilson will also lend their insights. Guided bus, boat and walking tours will explore Sarasota’s mid-century legacy by land and sea. Many festival gatherings will take place in acclaimed modernist structures. 

In Search of New Jersey Modernism: A Survey of Progressive Architecture 1944-1970

By Marlana Moore
 
New Jersey is a state not often renowned for its beauty, elegance and innovation, especially in context to its postwar suburban development. My internship for Docomomo US New York/Tristate took me through twenty-five years of the periodical Progressive Architecture in search of New Jersey modernism. Progressive Architecture was a national publication active in the heyday of modernism, from the 1940s – 1980s which was meant to showcase innovative buildings, trends, methods and practices occurring in the field of architecture. The internship program I participated in, part of the Rutgers University Department of Art History, seeks to identify and document modernist architecture in New Jersey. The sites I found have been added to a growing database of buildings, sites and architects who were active in New Jersey.

Mellon Square: Pittsburgh's Seminal Modernist Park

By Susan Rademacher, Parks Curator
Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy
 
The rededication of Mellon Square on May 29, 2014 marked the celebration of a $10 million project by the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy to restore a celebrated, but long-neglected, Modernist landscape. Hailed as a masterwork when it originally opened in 1955, Mellon Square was the first modern garden plaza built atop a parking garage, and a forerunner of green roof design. Today it is once again an oasis of beauty in the city’s urban center.

Metabolist Design: The Nakagin Capsule Tower, Japan

Text and Images by Jessica Baldwin

Today preservation efforts in the United States and all over the world are more and more focused on post-war architecture. In Japan, rapid development and the ever rising cost of real estate leaves much of post war architecture at risk. The Nakagin Capsule Tower, arguably one of the most iconic and acknowledged pieces of architecture in the World, stands as a statement to post-war architecture and urban development. 

Learning from Prentice

Prentice | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Interior | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Meeting | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Outreach Day | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Chicago Modern Lecture | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Panel Discussion | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Advertising on the L train | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Rally | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Bowling for Prentice | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Chicago Architecture Foundation Tour | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Demolition | Source: Chris Enck
Demolition | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice Demolition | Source: Save Prentice Coalition
Prentice | Source: Hedrich Blessing


Welcome Docomomo US/Michigan!

Docomomo US has another chapter to add to its fold, this time it’s Michigan! The architectural historians, preservationists, and modern enthusiasts of Michigan have been talking about starting a chapter for years. However, it appears that moving slow and steady has been the best method in getting to the end of the race to a brand new beginning for advocacy, education, and outreach of modern design across the state’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. 

Gio Ponti: Fantasia Italiana in New York

Alitalia Offices, 5th Avenue, NY; Gio Ponti, 1958. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Alitalia Offices, 5th Avenue, NY; Gio Ponti, 1958. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Furniture Window and Organized Walls, Altamira, NY, Gio Ponti, 1953. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
“A Dining Room to Look At", mechanized dining-room displayed at the MUSA exhibition, the Brooklyn Museum, NY, Gio Ponti, 1950 | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives
Auditorium at the 8th Floor at the Time Life Building; NY, Gio Ponti, 1959. | Source: Gio Ponti Archives


Docomomo US Welcomes Three New Board Members in Houston

Docomomo US announced the election of three new members to its Board of Directors: Jennifer Magnolfi of New York, Robert Pullum of San Francisco and Robert Thomas of Boston. 

"Docomomo US is pleased to bring on Jennifer Magnolfi, Robert Pullum and Robert Thomas as new board members. Bob, Jen and Bob each bring a wealth of experience and dedication to modern architecture and design. Their knowledge continues to broaden the expertise and capabilities of the board, and strengthen the organization." 

 

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